Reuss Confirms “Wide Range” Of C8 Corvette Variants

Coupes And Hard-Top Convertibles Have Been Spied, With High-Performance Variants To Come

“I don’t know how to put it into words,” said GM President Mark Reuss regarding his excitement to officially reveal the 2020 C8 Corvette. Reuss was present during the Cadillac CT4-V and CT5-V reveals in Detroit last week.

GM will officially lift the curtain on its most anticipated model in decades on July 18, 2019.

“Everybody’s worked so hard on it. It’s so beautiful, and when you see it, I think you’re going to be pretty amazed. We did it all in house.”

The last bit seems to call out Ford Motor Company without saying as much. Because with it came to the $400,000 Ford GT supercar, the Dearborn-based automaker outsourced much of the program to Canada’s Multimatic. Multimatic designs, develops and produces various components for both road cars and race cars. Its DSSV dampers can be found in products ranging from the fifth-generation Chevrolet Camaro Z/28, to the Colorado ZR2 pickup. But its development and production of the Ford GT is perhaps the most significant project in the company’s 35-year history.

With that being said, it’s expected that the 2020 C8 Corvette will cost a fraction of the Ford GT, with starting prices forecasted to be in the window of the current C7 Corvette Grand Sport MSRP of roughly $66,000 and the C7 Z06 MSRP of $80,000. It will be built on an assembly line at GM’s Corvette plant in Bowling Green, Kentucky. A sharp contrast to the extremely limited-run and hand-built nature of the Ford GT.

 

“There’s the Global B backbone of it,” Reuss mentioned. This is this first time Reuss confirmed that the 2020 C8 Corvette will integrate GM’s new Global B electronic architecture, which is aimed to control various electronic components of a vehicle, featuring over 100 modules. These components include the latest in active safety technology, high capacity for connectivity, as well as driverless technologies such as Super Cruise, and will upgrade itself with OTA updates. The 2020 Cadillac CT5 will begin the rollout of Global B.

The new electronic architecture could also be one of the reasons why the ECU of the 2020 C8 Corvette will be one of the most difficult systems that the aftermarket industry will ever attempt to hack due to cybersecurity advancements. More than certainly it was the fault of the new Global B architecture for the six-month delay in the new Corvette’s development.

Speaking on what else the world can expect about the new Corvette, Reuss mentioned that “there’s the wide range of models that people will be able to see and want.” While Reuss didn’t get any more specific than that, two body styles have so far been spotted by spy photographers; a traditional two-door coupe, and a hard-top convertible. It’s expected that the Corvette lineup will dovetail from there, with the rollout of higher-performance models such as a new C8 Z06 and new C8 ZR1. It’s been rumored that these vehicles will push output to an astonishing 1,000 horsepower from a twin-turbo V8 engine, assisted by electric power. Yes, for the first time ever, the Corvette will introduce a hybrid model.

When asked if GM will make a Cadillac variant of the mid-engine Corvette, Reuss simply replied “we’ll see.”

Written by Manoli Katakis

Detroit Region SCCA Member and founder of MC&T. Automotive Media Jedi Knight. Not yet the rank of Master.

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